Category Archives: Essays on Philosophy

Essay: Warren’s arguments on morality and abortion

Sample Essay

Warren’s arguments on morality and abortion center on the main premise that a fetus potential of being a person does not grant it a right to life. The argument however is countered by a number of individuals who point that in this train of thought, then new born babies have no right to life, and also non-human animal murdering will be allowed (Warren, 1973, pp. 105-106).

Essay: Six Stages of Moral Reasoning

Sample Essay

On the basis of this research, Kohlberg identified six stages of moral reasoning which are grouped into three major levels. In the pre-conventional morality level, people judge an action by its direct consequences.

Essay: America’s belief system

Sample Essay

McGee (2008) cautioned that working in Muslim countries like Afghanistan, U.S. personnel must maintain an understanding that the U.S. does not seek to “transform” cultures or to make their belief systems compatible with America’s belief system. He noted that while the goal of the U.S. is to “spread democratic ideals” it is not, nor should it be, an effort to transplant American culture and values or to impose our religion(s) on the Muslim world (p. 21). He stated that if America and its NATO allies are to succeed in their nation-building efforts in Afghanistan and throughout the region, “we cannot simply dismiss those elements of culture and civilization with which we disagree” (p. 22). Rather, he argued for the potential to build bridges of meaning across the cultures to identify shared objectives in the realms of education and economic improvement.

Essay: Ideas Given by Descartes Philosophy

Sample Essay

The ideas that he majorly refers to are of the sort that examine as to how a leader or a ruler is supposed to behave with regards to the state or regime he is governing, and what methods he should apply in order to make sure that his control over the state remains constant and dominant. His vision as far as the religious values of that time were concerned was that the state had an absolute authority, not like the one as granted by the Roman Catholic Church which stated that it vested in the powers of God and the Church, and had to be governed thus according to their morals and principles. The extent to what he thought was of the importance of religion was as to how it led towards the order and maintenance of the social order and if a need arises where the security of the state demands that it must be disposed of, it should be.